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moviestarmaker
Community Member
Posts: 199
Registered: ‎12-28-2010

SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

SCAMS COMMITTED BY EBAY BUYERS


 


These scams are targeted against unsuspecting eBay sellers. Many of the scams take advantage of sellers not knowing all the rules for safe trading on eBay. It is very important for a seller to completely understand PayPal's seller protection program. Familiarize yourself with the scams listed below. You don't want to be the next victim of an eBay scammer.


 


Examining the buyer's feedback may not reveal any clues about the intent of the buyer. Building strong feedback isn't as important for buyers as it is for sellers. Many legitimate buyers have a feedback score of less than 5. Take a look at the buying pattern of the buyer. If they have bought similar or related items in the past, then the buyer is most likely legitimate.


 


On the other hand, if they have only bought a few really cheap items in the past and all of a sudden they are buying a very expensive item, be very careful. You can't distinguish between a scammer and a legitimate buyer when the feedback is low. Follow all the procedures to the letter. If the buyer behaves suspiciously and won't confirm the shipping address, refund the payment, file a non-paying bidder alert and relist the item.


 


Item Not Received Scam


 


Scammers often prey on newbie sellers that don't understand the rules of using PayPal. Many new sellers don't know about delivery confirmation. The scammer will use PayPal to pay for the item and wait for it to be delivered. Once the package arrives, the scammer will check if delivery confirmation was used. If it was, then you are safe and the scammer and will try to find another victim.


 


However, if delivery confirmation is not used, the scammer will open a dispute with PayPal and claim the item was not received. Unable to show proof of delivery, PayPal takes the funds out of the seller's account and returns it to the scammer. There is nothing the seller can do other than learn a hard lesson.


 


To prevent this type of scam from occurring, clearly state delivery confirmation will be used in the item listing. This will prevent scammers from bidding on your items in the first place. Shipments using UPS, FedEx, and DHL automatically come with delivery confirmation. You must add delivery confirmation for packages shipped by USPS. Keep the delivery confirmation number for at least 45 days after the payment was received. This is the time limit for buyers to initiate claims against sellers.


 


Over $250 PayPal Scam


 


This scam is similar to the "item not received" scam. Again, the scammer will use PayPal to pay for the item and wait for it to be delivered. The difference is the item sells for $250 or more. When the package arrives, the scammer will check if signature confirmation was used. If so, the scammer will leave the seller alone and move on.


 


If not, the scammer will open a dispute with PayPal and claim the item was not received. Even if the seller used delivery confirmation and can show the item was delivered, it will not help. Without proof of delivery using signature confirmation for items $250 or more, PayPal will take the funds out of the seller's account and return it to the scammer. This is an extremely hard lesson to learn as the item may have been quite valuable.


 


This exact scam happened to me. I sold an item for $254 to a scammer using delivery confirmation. The scammer claimed to PayPal the item never arrived. I was able to show proof of delivery with delivery confirmation. I pointed out the buyer had bad feedback and similar issues with other sellers. I mentioned the item was only $4 over the $250 limit. None of it worked. PayPal took the money from my account and gave it back to the scammer. I learned a hard lesson.


 


To protect yourself from this scam, always use signature confirmation for items that sell for $250 or more when PayPal is used. Add an extra $5 to the handling fee to cover the extra cost of using signature confirmation if you know your item will sell for over $250. Pay for the signature confirmation out of your own pocket if necessary.


 


Credit Card Chargeback Scam


 


PayPal allows buyers to fund their purchases with a credit card. This is very convenient for buyers, but opens the door to fraud for sellers. If the credit card being used is stolen or the buyer initiates a chargeback, the credit card company will take the money back from PayPal. Whether PayPal takes the money from the seller's account depends if the purchase is eligible for PayPal's seller protection policy.


 


To be eligible, the seller must ship to the buyer's confirmed shipping address. Unfortunately, many legitimate buyers have not taken the time to confirm their shipping address with PayPal. It is not worth the hassle of convincing buyers of inexpensive items to confirm their shipping address. Scammers don't usually bother with these types of items and I have not had any problems with this approach so far. However, for expensive items, clearly state you will only ship to confirmed shipping addresses in your listing. Don't make any exceptions. The stakes are too high to risk a chargeback.


 


Fake Money Order / Cashier's Check Scam


 


Money orders and cashier's checks used to be considered as good as cash. Not anymore. The proliferation of high quality counterfeit money orders and cashier's checks has put an end to that. Don't be fooled if your bank accepts the counterfeit and credits your account. If it turns out to be a fake, the bank with take the money back out of your account. Bank tellers are not experts at spotting fakes and it could take weeks before the bank finally discovers that it is a counterfeit.


 


This scam generally comes in two flavors. The dollar amount on the money order is for the exact purchase price, or dollar amount could also be in excess of the purchase price. In the latter case, the scammer will want you to refund the difference between the amount on the money order and the purchase price. Don't fall for this. Whenever someone wants you to refund money for a money order or cashier's check, it is always a scam. Scammers will try all sorts of trick to get you to comply. The people that fall for this scam get greedy as they are led to believe that they can keep a large portion of the money order. Often, these types of scams are perpetrated by people in foreign countries. Be on your guard when dealing with international buyers.


 


Send UPS / FedEx / DHL Truck To Pick Up The Item Scam


 


Some scammers try to trick the seller into shipping the item before it has been paid for. What the scammers do is arrange for a shipper like UPS go to the seller's location to pick up the item. If the person that greets the UPS driver is unaware that the item has not been paid for, they may actually hand over the package. Once the item has been picked up, there is no way to stop the package from being delivered to the scammer. This scam relies on confusion at the seller's premises to work. Since the scammer does pay for the shipping, this scam is typically attempted on expensive items.


 


Someone tried to pull this scam on us by sending over a FedEx truck to pick up some expensive electronics that we were selling. Luckily we knew that the item was not paid for and we sent the FedEx driver away and relisted the item. What we should have done was to give the driver a big oversized box of bricks. This would have cost the scammer some good money to ship the bricks back to him.


 


Buyer Requests Shipping to Different Address Scam


 


This scam usually occurs when an innocent victim's PayPal account has been hijacked. The scammer will not change the hijacked account's shipping address as this will send an email to the true account holder. Instead, the scammer will try to convince a seller to ship the item to a different address which is often in another country. Typically the scammer will claim that he is moving or that the item is for a friend. Don't fall for any stories. Ship your items only to the confirmed address. If the buyer want to ship to a different address, insist that the buyer change the shipping address on their PayPal account to where they want it shipped and reconfirm it. Otherwise you will be liable if a chargeback occurs.


 


You Have Been Chosen To Sell Our Products Scam


 


An unsolicited email will be sent to your eBay account. The email will compliment you on your great positive feedback and state that you have been selected to be an exclusive seller of some fancy products. All you have to do is list the items for sale on your account. When you receive payment, you keep a portion and send the rest to them. Then they will ship the product to the buyer. It sounds like a perfect drop ship opportunity. Yes, perfect for the scammer.


 


Of course, after you send the money to the scammer, they won't send anything to the buyer. This means that you will be left holding the bag when the buyer demands their money back. The best thing to do is delete all unsolicited emails offering you an "opportunity" to sell exclusive products.


 


Blame The Shipper For Damaged Item Scam


 


A scammer will have a broken or damaged item that he wants replaced for free. The scammer will search for an eBay seller selling exactly the same item and offering shipping insurance. After the item is received, the scammer will switch the unbroken item for the bad one and claim it has been damaged.


 


If the shipper grants the insurance claim, the scammer will get his item replaced for free. If the insurance claim is denied (because there is no damage to the box and the scammer forgot to smash it), the scammer will have the credit card company reverse the charges. If the purchase was eligible for seller's protection, then you will be protected and PayPal will eat the loss. Otherwise, PayPal will take the money from your account. This is a tricky area as PayPal will not cover claims of shipping damage.


 


You can protect yourself from this scam by taking pictures of serial numbers or other unique identifying features. Be sure to include them in your listing. Scammers will avoid listings that can prove the item has been switched.


 

"When you have the choice to be right or be kind, always choose being kind."---Wayne Dyer
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collectablememories52
Community Member
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎06-26-2010

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

Thanks!  The one I hadn't encountered is the two address scam-I am advised!  I haven't a lot of sympathy for THOSE SCAMMING BUMS!


Kathy


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moviestarmaker
Community Member
Posts: 199
Registered: ‎12-28-2010

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

Switch and Return - This is where the buyer will buy the item, and return it after receiving it. However, the item that they return is not yours, but theirs. Their purpose, to upgrade their product without paying any money out. So, if a buyer contacts you with questions about your return policy-that's a red flag.

"When you have the choice to be right or be kind, always choose being kind."---Wayne Dyer
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chipmunkmommy
Community Member
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎11-21-2011

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

Thank you for that good info!!! I will be on the look out a little more now.

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bokhoma
Community Member
Posts: 297
Registered: ‎03-19-2010

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

It happens.  Always has happened when people are trying to sell items to the public.  The retail industry for the term is "SHRINKAGE".   Items get broken or stolen or misplaced.  I have sold items in antique malls, flea markets, public auctions, and through e-commerce sites.  Sadly, "shrinkage" is a cost of doing business.  You just have to add that cost into your price and move on.


Thanks...


Joe...aka...bokhoma

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craneoperator_4
Community Member
Posts: 21
Registered: ‎01-27-2011

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

Thing is ebay supports these buyers by finding in their favor and not reversing a decision after finding out the buyer is a scammer after they closed the case in buyers favor.There was a lot of negative comments on Yahoo yesterday about ebay..Thing was most of them were very true.

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Community Member
Posts: 204
Registered: ‎07-05-2011

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

Specifically to Joe...aka...bokhoma




You are absolutely ridiculous to think people should agree with your stance to "shrug it off". It is that kind of attitude that has caused the rest of the world to turn against America. I wish you wouldn't give me a bad name like that. The too loud few should not speak for the many as you are trying to do in this case.

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bokhoma
Community Member
Posts: 297
Registered: ‎03-19-2010

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

bearly_used_treasures......it sounds like you are trying to make this into some kind of distorted political issue.  It is NOT at all.  It is a BUSINESS issue.  Scammers and thieves know no political boundaries.  They can be from Asia, South America, Eastern Europe, the Middle East as well as Vermont, Oregon, Texas or any other US state.  If you read Sam Walton's (the Walmart founder) book you will know he devoted a lot of attention and detail to "shrinkage."  He did his best to keep it to under 5%.  That was part of his success.  Talk to any successful B & M retailer and he will tell you that theft and scams are part of the business.  Most or all would gladly lower their prices by at least 5 % if they could be guaranteed that there would be theft and scam free forever.  If you ever get the chance to visit with an insurance claims adjuster ask them about fraud and scams.  They can fill your ears full.  Your auto and homeowners insurance might drop by 15 % or more were it not for the crooks...


 


Personally, I have chased shoplifters (literally) and prosecuted them.  I do not like being scammed or stolen from.  But I understand it comes with the territory. I can try to protect myself as much as possible but at the end of the day I realize that I cannot totally control "shrinkage."  I have to add it to the overhead cost and move on.  Otherwise it will drive you nuts.


 


Thanks...


Joe...aka...bokhoma

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moviestarmaker
Community Member
Posts: 199
Registered: ‎12-28-2010

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

The most common way buyers try to take advantage of sellers is through Feedback Extortion. In this scam, a buyer threatens negative feedback unless the seller provides a partial refund. You can avoid this by communicating with the buyer through the eBay invoice system. If you get a buyer doing this, report him to eBay and he'll be prevented from leaving you feedback or filing a buyer protection case against you.

"When you have the choice to be right or be kind, always choose being kind."---Wayne Dyer
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moviestarmaker
Community Member
Posts: 199
Registered: ‎12-28-2010

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

Sellers Beware!

"When you have the choice to be right or be kind, always choose being kind."---Wayne Dyer
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docmcstuffins
Community Member
Posts: 120
Registered: ‎06-02-2011

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

scam committed by ebay sellers  (OP)


 


- "BECOME AN ACTOR & CELEBRITY IN 2012!" 


;-):^O

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Community Member
Posts: 40
Registered: ‎05-01-2011

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker


The "Item not received" scam was used on me once. Now I always get Delivery Confirmation even though it costs .85 cents extra. I have to raise my prices enough to cover shipping and DC.




If you print your label online, it is only 13 cents for items not sent Priority.  Priority is free.



And it can be added (for 13 cents) to first class by making the envelope large enough that it can not go through the scanner (usually move than 1/2 inch).  That can be accomplished using stacked cardboard about an inch square or a water or coke bottle cap (wrapped in such a way to not harm the item itself).

Everything will be alright in the end. So if things are not alright, it is not the end.
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Community Member
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎04-11-2012

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

@Joe...aka...bokhoma



I've been a small business owner for years. I understand shrinkage. It's the loss you take when an employee takes pens home. It's the loss you take when a sly theif "five-finger discounts" smaller items while paying for larger.



I deal with higher end electronics and computers. My average sale is around $200. I can't write off a complete unit as shrinkage because each unit I sell, buys me two at wholesale. Mathematically, by losing one item to buyer scams I'm actually losing three. Espcially when the Buyer Protection Policy allows eBay to seize the amount of the sale immediatlely when the buyer makes their claim.



I'm going through this right now with a buyer who simply had buyer's remorse. I tried to state my case but eBay customer service doesn't even look at the scenario. They figure if you can't work it out with the buyer yourself, then you're at fault. I was told by a customer service agent herself, that it was best that I just succumb to the buyer's request before it escalated. This is eBay's official stance! WHAT?!?!  ARE YOU KIDDING ME! I'm just supposed to take them for their word?



This is why I've decided to pull all my listings from here and go to Amazon. I can't do business like this. It's fine if you're selling anything under $100 and can afford such shrinkage. I cannot.

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sonic*bruise
Community Member
Posts: 535
Registered: ‎01-10-2011

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

One of the bywords of an eBay seller


is to never sell anything you cannot afford to lose.


After a slew of eBay policy changes, I had to adjust my selling model considerably.


The things I used to make the most money on I no longer sell here.

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discuss*stuff
Community Member
Posts: 1,318
Registered: ‎03-22-2011

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

...never sell anything you cannot afford to lose


 


Yup...good basics...and yet I'm amazed in some of the upper end items I see listed...especially in watches...some pretty pricey kites too... :-)


 


As to scams, I've been fortunate to have only been hit by one...the guy switched my better quality item for his and returned for a replacement...not a big loss since his sold for about the same in an as described condition...sure wouldn't want to depend on eBay for my livelihood though.

ebay...the new spectator sport
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bokhoma
Community Member
Posts: 297
Registered: ‎03-19-2010

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

shivastudioslv wrote:


 


"


@Joe...aka...bokhoma


 


I've been a small business owner for years. I understand shrinkage. It's the loss you take when an employee takes pens home. It's the loss you take when a sly theif "five-finger discounts" smaller items while paying for larger.


 


I deal with higher end electronics and computers. My average sale is around $200. I can't write off a complete unit as shrinkage because each unit I sell, buys me two at wholesale. Mathematically, by losing one item to buyer scams I'm actually losing three. Espcially when the Buyer Protection Policy allows eBay to seize the amount of the sale immediatlely when the buyer makes their claim.


 


I'm going through this right now with a buyer who simply had buyer's remorse. I tried to state my case but eBay customer service doesn't even look at the scenario. They figure if you can't work it out with the buyer yourself, then you're at fault. I was told by a customer service agent herself, that it was best that I just succumb to the buyer's request before it escalated. This is eBay's official stance! WHAT?!?!  ARE YOU KIDDING ME! I'm just supposed to take them for their word?


 


This is why I've decided to pull all my listings from here and go to Amazon. I can't do business like this. It's fine if you're selling anything under $100 and can afford such shrinkage. I cannot."


 


_____________________________________________________


 


I agree with a most of that.  If you notice I stated that I do as much as possible to protect myself but at the end of the day I must pass along "shrinkage" in the selling price.   One of the things I do to protect myself is try to avoid selling on eBay items that seem to attract a lot of interest from scammers.  From what I read on these discussion boards electronics seem to be near the top of the list of items that are targeted.  I would, like you, be very reluctant to sell high price electronics on eBay.


 


If I did sell items on eBay that seem to be higher than normal targets items for fraud I would have a "shrinkage" surcharge.  A normal $200 item might be a $210-$220 item here. 


 


Your experience with eBay customer service is very much like many I have read from sellers on these boards.  You must understand that it is a BUYERS market.  And the internet e-commerce competition is growing every day.  More and more companies are offering more and more items for sale on line.  It is no longer just auction sites on line but the traditional B & M companies that are growing their sites.  Competition for buyers is intense.  And eBay is awash in sellers.  According to Power Sellers Unite eBay has over 146 millions items listed currently.  That is up some 40 % in just the past year.  So we sellers are not that special.  But the buyers are and eBay is catering to them in a big way.  The old supply and demand thing.  Over stock of sellers, lack of buyers.


 


Joe...aka...bokhoma

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Community Member
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎03-11-2012

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

Here is how EBAY Buyers abroad get FREE STUFF



International Shipping Scam tolerated by EBAY BUYER PROTECTION



Here is how the Scam works



Seller place item on EBAY


International Buyer wins item and pays for item plus S&H


You print international postage and custom forms from EBAY and get a tracking number starting with two letters and followed by numbers


You Ship item thru USPS



LOOK AND BEWARE



USPS accepts item


Item makes it all the way to Jamaica NY, 11430 USPS Origin Sort Facility


NOW USPS Tracking number stops here


Tracking numbers that starts with letters do not require scanning or tracking by destination Country Postal Service


Item is now en route to destination



HERE IS THE SCAM



Buyer waits a couple of weeks


Buyer place a claim to EBAY RESOLUTION CENTER stating he did not receive item


even if they did receive the item in question


EBAY Resolution Center contact Seller to provide USPS Tracking Number


Tracking Number shows final destination as Jamaica, NJ USPS Origin Sort Facility


EBAY Resolution Center will never receive a tracking confirmation from destination and will never receive proof of delivery even if item has arrived to destination.


Case is closed in FAVOR of Buyer because tracking number can not be accounted for after Jamaica, NJ , USPS Origin Sort Facility


Buyer gets back FULL amount they paid plus S&H



Buyer Gets Items for FREE and All Money Back



Seller is out of Item and Money



EBAY Resolution Center answer to this is that Seller should have had the item insured and registered


EBAY Resolution Center do not control any part of the shipping process that is “ conveniently” located on it's website.


Tracking number is absolutely USELESS


EBAY BUYER PROTECTION will close claim on BUYERS FAVOR knowing this SCAM is HAPPENING


USPS do not have any mechanism in place for you to file a CLAIM for stuff sold internationally



Seller is SCREWED



Creatureunlimited Lost $39.45



DO NOT BE THE NEXT VICTEM


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craneoperator_4
Community Member
Posts: 21
Registered: ‎01-27-2011

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

Ebay Just keeps opening doors for these scammers and most usually at the sellers expense.I think they sit around eating chili and having brain farts when they think they came up with something good.There are too many loopholes that allow scammers to win and ebay knows this but have not remedied the problem.Updates to the eBay Buyer Protection Policy and Funds Availability Program is a joke.More for the scammers and not the sellers.

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moviestarmaker
Community Member
Posts: 199
Registered: ‎12-28-2010

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

I do not think sellers should be allowed to leave Buyers Negative feedback because of possible retaliation and other problems.


 


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHZ4wsR5Dnc

"When you have the choice to be right or be kind, always choose being kind."---Wayne Dyer
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oliver906susan
Community Member
Posts: 2,302
Registered: ‎07-07-2010

Re: SCAMS committed by eBay buyers:

in reply to moviestarmaker

Did you see this comment?


 


If the buyer paid 130.00 for the item and let's say 15.00 for shipping for a total of 145.00 and then they return the items to you and you reimburse 145.00 how are you out shipping costs? The buyer paid for the original shipping charge not you.


 


Are people really that clueless?  I guess since the shipping was refunded the Post Office will return the money the seller spent on shipping!  :-D


 


 



smiley candle photo: candle candlef.gifFounding member of the Pack of Disgruntled Failures.
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