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Answer
Community Member
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-10-2012
Accepted Solution
I do not want to sell my item if the final bidding is too low

I am a new seller.  Do I have to sell an item if the bidding does not reach the amount that I would like to sell?

Accepted Solutions: 6
cute.shoes
Community Member
Posts: 9,339
Registered: ‎02-13-2006
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

Yes.

 

Because YOU had the option of putting a starting price that was the MINIMUM you were willing to accept for the item.

If you started it at a price that was less than that -- that's your fault.

Selling mistakes can be expen$ive.

 

IF the item has more than 12 hours left - you CAN end the listing (canceling all bids in the process) and then relist it with a price that IS the minimum you are willing to accept for the item.

__________ _________ _________ __________
See my "me" page to learn what smart sellers do.
leo*spride
Community Member
Posts: 5,910
Registered: ‎04-02-2008
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

Yes... you're obligated to sell to the highest bidder for his winning amount if you didn't pay for eBay's Reserve Price feature to protect your low starting bid.

 

One of your current auctions is troublesome...

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Fantastic-antique-Middle-Eastern-hand-made-Silver-Serving-Tray-dated-before-...

 

If this tray is worth as much as your Buy It Now price indicates, the first person to place a bid can win it for the minimum bid amount.  BIN prices don't protect you against low winning bidders.

 

Read about eBay's Reserve Price structure...

 

http://pages.ebay.com/help/sell/reserve.html

 

Good luck!

Graciously Grin When You Growl
Community Member
Posts: 53
Registered: ‎10-30-2011
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

Yes you have to sell it you should have put a amount that you would like if you start at $0.99 it can go for that

silverstrad
Community Member
Posts: 13,415
Registered: ‎03-11-2003
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

You have to sell to the highest bidder, unless the reserve has not been met.

 

It is up to you to make sure that your starting bid is high enough, so that you will be happy with it if it is the only bid.

 

And,, since you are selling some higher priced items, I do hope that you will be on the lookout for scammers.

They tend totarget new sellers and try to convince them toi ship items before they actually have been paid.

 

lending_a_hand
Community Member
Posts: 436
Registered: ‎01-18-2009
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

YES!

 

You have two options when you list an item:

 

(1) Start the bidding at the lowest price you are willing to sell it for.

 

(2) Start the bidding at a low amount, and ADD A RESERVE price; this will PREVENT the auction from being won if no one bids high enough to meet the reserve amount you set.

 

Using a reserve costs more money and turns a lot of buyers off, so number 1 is the better option.

 

 

Community Member
Posts: 26
Registered: ‎09-17-2011
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

Yes

 

You shouldn't start the bidding at less than the minimum amount you are willing to accept.

 

 






Other Answers: 12
jfk9
Community Member
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎08-23-2004
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar
No, you dont' have to and should not give your stuff away. Case in point. If it costs more to ship something than you received you are under no obligation to send it. The buyer is well aware he might be getting a deal. Using the argument that you posted so and so is not a valid argument. Sometime you might want to eat a partial loss. That's OK in the beginning. The idea that you have to send an expensive item to someone and not make any money on it is completely bogus. It might be a bit of a hassle but so what--keep your item and fix the problem. We all make mistakes but should not let a buyer take unfair advantage.
entropii
Community Member
Posts: 2,752
Registered: ‎12-06-2007
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

Your Buy it Now prices disappeared.  They are not reserves, and go away with the first bid except in 4 categories which you aren't in.  Generally list your BIN price within 10-15% of the starting bid, because people just aren't going to BIN when they can bid.

 

Most bidding happens in the last few minutes.  Your choice if you want to start over or not.  To cancel bids/end listings, see the dropdown menu end of row.

 

You listed a silver tray twice.  Did you mean to do that?  Keep an eye on your listings.

 

I would relist ALL except the silver ring if you don't have BLOCKS set in your seller account buyer prefs, especially out of the US and no Paypal and 2 strikes in 12 months.

Do NOT respond to ANY special requests.  Do NOT believe any emails saying you have been paid.  DO ship with Delivery Confirmation and add Signature Required if $250+.

Do not ship to any address that isn't showing on the shipping label.

You are open to many scams.  Ask here about the slightest thing.

jennyslacker
Community Member
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎11-21-2010
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

I was actually not aware that you could cancel a listing that already had bids.  And you most certainly do not want to not honor an auction that someone has won.  This is a binding contract, and, while you're unlikely to be sued, it will ruin your eBay reputation.  Either way...this is a very bad idea if you ever want to be a successful seller on eBay. Serious eBay buyers always look at seller feedback (just as sellers look at buyer feedback.  I won't buy from anyone who isn't in the high 90's percentage wise and I also read the comments.  I made some pretty costly rookie mistakes as a new seller on eBay, but I felt morally obligated to honor the contract and in doing so I enjoy a very good eBay rep as a buyer and a seller.

queeneightsuited
Community Member
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-18-2013
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

The problem is that no rational person would sell their items at a loss. I mean, paying for an item that you will have to give to someone else.

Morals, codes and honouring and rules don't matter when you look deep deep down. Don't think so highly of yourselves

remembering*rusty
Community Member
Posts: 441
Registered: ‎05-09-2004
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

Before listing anything for sale on ebay, read this:

 

http://pages.ebay.com/sellerinformation/howtosell/sellingbasics.html

 

If you are listing your ZYCHTJJ with an opening bid of $1.00 and free shipping, an the high bid is $1.05 you sold it for $1.05 and free shipping.  Exception to this would be if you listed your auction with a reserve price....you are not obligated to sell unless the item meets or exceeds your reserve.  In as much as the "bid is a binding contract" on the buyer, it is also binding to the seller.  NEVER list an item for less than you can afford to let it go for.....buyers can, and will, report you as a non-performing seller for not honoring their bid.

manhattanconnection
Community Member
Posts: 58
Registered: ‎06-03-2008
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

Ebay gives you the option of putting a reserve on it. If you don't have any bids, and it's not closing for at least 24 hours, click on revise, and put in your reserve. You don't have to cancel your listing unless it is less than 24 hours to go.

sweetthingsvintage
Community Member
Posts: 38,008
Registered: ‎08-20-2006
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

Ending a listing early because of low bids can be a mistake for a couple of reasons.  First...Ebay will now charge you Final Value Fees even though the item didn't sell because it's very disappointing to search and find items to bid on and not get a chance to complete the auction.  And, second, because many seasoned buyers use snipe bid programs that bid in the last 20 seconds...and you don't know what they will bid until it's over.  It's not uncommon for the big money players to play last.

Becky

The More You List, The More You Sell! :smileyhappy:
Community Member
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-06-2014
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar
What is the point of an auction if someone pulls their item after the final bid? eBay might as well just have everyone sell their items for a set price.
Community Member
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎12-10-2013
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

i have put something on ebay that is worth at least £20 but a bid has gone in for 99p and no one else is bidding for it, i do not want to see it go for anything less than £15 is there any way i can take it off sale?

Community Member
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎11-08-2013
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar
I think it has been well covered in your responses that per eBay policy, you have to sell the item for whatever the final bid is, no matter how low. If you made a huge mistake, you have decide what is worth more to you: the value of your item or your eBay reputation. If its not that important that you continue selling on EBay, then you can take the hit to your feedback and just not ship the item (plus refund the paid amount and I'd add an apology note since it was not the buyer's fault!) I do sympathize with the situation....it's a novel mistake, and next time I'm sure you'll be adding a higher minimal starting bid!
Community Member
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎03-10-2014
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

If I am dissapointed in the bidding of an item I am trying to sell, can I cancel the listing without paying the fees?

ksbasement
Community Member
Posts: 49
Registered: ‎10-11-2009
Answered
in reply to abrahambazaar

Yes, if you have a bid you have to sell. The best thing to do is figure out how much $$ you need to get for the item to cover all the expenses (fees, shipping if it's included), then set your starting price. My way of thinking is the starting price should be the least amount you want to take for the item but will still make $$. Another option is to set a reserve, that way you can start the auction very low & there is a chance that it will get bid up to what you want/reserve price, I do think there is a charge to set a reserve.

Welcome aboard, and good luck.