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Community Member
Posts: 140
Registered: ‎01-23-2003

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

I know nothing about furniture but recently obtained an Oak entertainment center. It is huge and heavy and in perfect condidtion. The owner said he paid about $3000 for it 2 years ago.

Qustion: Where does Thomasville fall in the scheme of the furniture world.
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Community Member
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-19-2003

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
It's supposed to be really good quality. Just the mention of it say's "big bucks". Enjoy your piece.
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Community Member
Posts: 2,013
Registered: ‎01-24-2003

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
I think the Thomasville is a very good quality. We finally replaced our beat up old couch and the ONLY thing we found that was made well enough to satify us AND was comfortable for BOTH of us was a Thomasville. Never been happier, and no more back aches either :smileysurprised:)
In the garden of your soul plant kindness and simplicity.
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ddiverblue
Community Member
Posts: 699
Registered: ‎12-05-2002

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
I've been looking around the Thomasville stores recently. They have wonderful things, and they are very well made! Your entertainment center should last for a lifetime.
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Community Member
Posts: 78
Registered: ‎05-12-2010

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
I live near a Thomasville store and go there to drool occasionally. It's pretty expensive. I think in the world of furniture (good/better/best) Thomasville would probably be a "better". It's not Hickory Chair or Drexel Heritage but it's lots better than say Bassett or Pennsylvania House. I'd compare it to Ethan Allen maybe. Of course, a lot depends on when the furniture was made. I think every year, some lines seem to go down hill. Pennsylvania House is not as good as it used to be, in my opinion. But nowadays even cheaper lines are expensive. I've been buying a lot of vintage/antique pieces to get the quality I like at prices I can afford.
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Community Member
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎01-08-2004

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
Hi guys. I'm a little late posting on this subject... I actually live in Thomasville, in front of one of the plants and within walking distance from the Big Chair. I used to work as a temp at Thomasville Furniture. It is very good quality furniture and the furniture market items especially are beautiful. If you are ever in Thomasville, right beside the corporate office is an outlet store. There are also tons of great places to get furniture at low prices in High Point, NC esp. after the furniture markets in April and October. :smileyhappy:
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Community Member
Posts: 88
Registered: ‎04-21-2004

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
I live about 10 minutes from Thomasville, and agree with crystal. They have nice furniture that should last for a long time.
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Community Member
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎04-17-2005

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
Way overpriced...same goes for most big furniture retailers...
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Community Member
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎10-30-2002

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
Thomasville is good quality, but as already noted; isn't in the same league with the really high end stuff and every year, what was once fine, becomes less so.

Sadly, there is little old growth hardwood remaining to be used in quality furniture and woods from fast growth, farmed trees is smaller and softer and now, to make thing worse, even compressed wood products can be labeled as "wood."

To buy the same quality new, in a retail store, as what as what was just "good" 40 - 60 years ago, can now cost as much as a new car, and then some.

I too have given up on buying new. I saw a Pennsylvania House cherry breakfront at a store back in 91', and while it was handsome and did at least have all dovetailed drawers and no hardboard, it was priced close to what I had just paid for a new, loaded Escort.

I found the same breakfront at a consignment shop just 3 years later, and bought it for $450.00. All it needed was one replacement glass shelf and minor touch ups on a few small nicks.

But when I look at they way my old (30's - 40's) Willett, Drexel and Hickory pieces are constructed, and the sheer quality of the woods and hand rubbed finishes.... No contest.

One way to get the really good stuff for a lot less and still have it look new: if you aren't into refinishing yourself, is to buy exceptionally high quality used at consignment shops and estate sales, and have them professionally refinished or reupolstered.

You could buy a an older, high quality piece for say; $250.00, pay up to $2 - 3,000.00 to have it redone, and still be way ahead of the game, in both money and quality.
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suebuys-4u
Community Member
Posts: 57
Registered: ‎10-06-2005

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
Thomasville is OK. You can buy it most anywhere. Not high quality any more. If the price isn't high it could be worth buying. Most of the new stuff is way overpriced

I bought my daughter a wall unit/ entertainment center in an East Coast city at a consignment shop. Front was nice mellow oak. Backing was lesser wood. Paid $589.00. Drop down desk, glass door bookcase, TV and accessories area, 2 side commode storage pieces, closed door cupboard area. Altogether it covers an 11 foot wall. Probably sold for several thousand dollars new. You tell me...is it a $4,000.00 wall unit....or a $589.00 wall unit?
If you are looking for quality and value buy high quality used furniture if you aren't sure.
I just bought a no-name cheap loveset new for $450.00. It's that micro fiber suede look upholstery, and I love it!. Quality is very good, fabric is lasting well, style and design and proportion is excellent. Name brands don't always mean quality.
Reuse Restore Repurpose - It's as simple as that.
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Community Member
Posts: 101
Registered: ‎08-07-2006

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
I personally don't see much richness in Thomasville as far as styles, but maybe it's just that I like antique, massive furniture more.

I guess it's a matter of personal opinion, but I do agree that a name brand doesn't always mean quality.

----------------------------------------------
Leaving to sell on my own website as of 5/3/08. Not taking a chance on the new eBay.
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Community Member
Posts: 120
Registered: ‎07-27-2006

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
I disagree with a few of the posters, a friend purchased a Thomasville Table, 4 chairs & server with marble top in mahogany for $10,700.

The attention to detail....I'd give it an A. The marble was very thick and of high quality. The drawers were dovetailed. The back of the server was NOT pressboard like so many other manufacturers are using.

On the flip side, I had our diningroom table custom-made with two leaves (self-storing) in solid cherry from an amish father/son team, of whom I use frequently, for $1800. He made my buffet in the olde colonial style, which is a bit higher with drawers to store my platters and linens in....in solid cherry, dovetailed drawers, and no pressboard.....$2500.

Remember, furniture stores have a very high markup....so custom is sometimes less expensive than store quality.
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jenessey
Community Member
Posts: 50
Registered: ‎05-18-2004

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
Furrycats, my desk is not custom but is new and Amish made. I have examined it every which way except upside down and no short-cuts were taken, even where they knew no one would look. It is also a superb adaptation of the Arts and Crafts style to our modern computer needs. Since it is solid wood, if something happens to it short of a fire, it can be repaired.

My parents owned pieces of Hekman furniture many years ago and I mistakenly believed anything they made would be of excellent quality. Apparently within the last 20 years or so they have gone the way of others, using composite wood products, which break and crumble when hit. I learned that the hard way earlier this year with an end table made in the 1980s that was destroyed beyond repair in shipping.

http://www.amishtouch.com/detailpage.asp?ID=42&Category=Office%20Furniture
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suebuys-4u
Community Member
Posts: 57
Registered: ‎10-06-2005

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
Sorry OT
furry, I would love to see your table. Cherry is the most beautiful wood for a table. You can see and appreciate the gorgeous detail in the wood. I have bought and sold several antique drop leaf cherry tables. I hate to see each and everyone go. What did you do about chairs.

We have an Amish community of craftsmen here. They do fine work. Alas, I haven't yet been able to afford to commission a piece, but when I do it will be a cherry table. Quite plain and quite large to sit 8. A natural finish to protect and seal, no staining. I will buy upholstered chairs to use with it.
Can you post a picture of yours?
Reuse Restore Repurpose - It's as simple as that.
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Community Member
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎10-30-2002

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
Many of these posts remind me why I learned to refinsh.

Chateau bottled tastes on a beer budget was a great encouragement to take the plunge many years ago, and once I learned how, it became easier, to the point of being simple: all it really takes is patience.

I know better than to mess with a genuine, historic antique, but good used, from the 20's - late 40's, is well worth the effort of stripping and refinishing to a result impossible to find on anything less than a hand crafted and hand finished custom piece, made for the very wealthy.

Look closely at the lousy finish on even the most expensive pieces now sold in even upscale shops! Spray stain/varnish is junk, and the least nick exposes the raw wood beneath.

Nothing will replace the finish that only an oil stain and hand rubbings over multiple coats of varnish can achieve, but I don't want to even think of what it would cost, if bought new.

BTW: I have visions of my grandaughter when she is my age, thanking me for leaving some of those pieces to her, but also cursing me for having refinished and thereby devalued genuine early 20th Century, 18th Century reproductions. LOL!
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jenessey
Community Member
Posts: 50
Registered: ‎05-18-2004

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
Auspler: I love to refinish old furniture also. The most fun is when you find a piece that has a bad paint job with gorgeous wood peeking through. I guess some love that "chippy peely" shabby chic look, but to me it's the perfect excuse to set the timer back on the piece to its birthday. Patina is one thing...built up ugly paint hiding beautiful wood is another.
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suebuys-4u
Community Member
Posts: 57
Registered: ‎10-06-2005

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
I learned in England and Eastern France, to build a finish by hand to refresh an old piece.. They have rooms in the back of shops and put in hours and hours on finishes on older pieces of wood furniture. Their hard work shows and certainly pays off for them. I couldn't even pick out the newly cleaned pieces.

There has been so much bad work done here to beautiful pieces. Once it is stripped it is usually ruined. I ruined several pieces when I was starting out. I made them crisp and clean and glossy. They sold anyway, but they all looked alike.

Refinishing shouldn't detract from the price of your older furniture. Unless it is a very expensive all original antique, you are probably adding to the value.
Reuse Restore Repurpose - It's as simple as that.
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Community Member
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎10-30-2002

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
suebys:

If done right, stripping doesn't ruin. It gives an even base to allow bringing a piece back to near original condition and beauty, as a using piece of furniture, rather than something to simply look at.

When I take a fine old piece that is sound but has seen better days, and refinish it the way I know how, to the point the wood gleams with a finish so rich and deep, it's impossible to describe; of course I'm adding to it's value, as a piece of furniture.

But when it was made in the 1920's, what I have done to it to bring it back, so I have something beautiful to use, may well be it's bane 100 years from now.

I have to chuckle when people bring their heirlooms onto the Road Show and are told how much it would be worth, if great grandma hadn't had it refinished.

Great grandma didn't want a very well made but a scuffed up and in her time, not valuable antique in her formal parlor anymore than I do.
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jenessey
Community Member
Posts: 50
Registered: ‎05-18-2004

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
Eugene on the Antiques board suggested a simple mixture of linseed oil and mineral spirits to "restore" some antique shutters I have. No one in their right mind would disturb the patina they earned through the years, but they were dull and dirty. Eugene made a point of stating this method should not be done on bare wood, only wood which still has an intact finish. It was extremely easy, inexpensive, did not disturb the patina, left a soft glow, and brought out the depth of color in the wood:

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Community Member
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎10-30-2002

Thomasville Furniture... Quality or not?

in reply to hifigi@hifigi.com
jenessy: That is a beautiful set of shutters and of course, Eugine is correct, especially when the piece is an antique, with fine patina under the grime.

But when it's not a genuine antique, but still a fine older piece, but it's been painted, or most of the finish has worn off, there is no patina to protect, and the only way to get it back to a functional condition is to strip then refinish carefully.

I have used the linseed oil/mineral spirits mix to restore only the intact varnish parts and although it takes far more effort to match the original finish, it can be done, and potential firewood can be brought back for another go at life, as a useful and attractive piece.

But not to decieve; just to restore it to nice using condition.

Part of the fun is the find; like a cat that's snagged a fat mouse with little effort.

Then to bring it back; to make it alive again, like a benign Frankinstein whose "creation" really is beautiful.

But for me, there is having a house filled with lovely, high quality furniture worth far more than we paid for the house, and all the land it's on, 35 years ago.

That's always good for another warm, fuzzy feeling.
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